Join me Saturday 30 January 2021 for a workshop that helps writers expand their range?

About this Event
This special one-off workshop brought to you by award-winning author, Shreya Sen-Handley has been designed to help writers realise the range of creative writing they are capable of doing and guide them on the road to expanding their repertoire.
Writers, like actors, can get typecast. But the ability to write in a range of formats, genres and styles not only means further opportunities to be published and read, but to grow as a writer, push boundaries, and enjoy our calling more. It means realising our full potential as writers, and as individuals too. This workshop will help you realise how versatile you are and guide you in expanding your repertoire.
About Shreya
Shreya Sen-Handley is the author of two books with HarperCollins, ‘Strange’, modern tales of the unexpected, and the award-winning ‘Memoirs of My Body’. A librettist for the Welsh National Opera, their multicultural opera ‘Migrations’ will go on tour in the UK next year. Shreya is also a columnist for the international media, writing for the National Geographic, CNN, The Guardian, and more, a creative writing teacher for British universities and other institutions, and an illustrator. Her short stories have been published, broadcast, and shortlisted for prizes in Britain, India and Australia. Her poetry, published, broadcast and performed in Britain and India, has spearheaded a British national campaign against hate crimes. She is currently working on a new Welsh National Opera production ‘Creating Change’, and writing her third book for HarperCollins, ‘The Accidental Tourist’.

Please click on pic for details.

University of Leicester’s Creative Writing spotlight on ‘Strange’

“Former television journalist and producer for CNBC and MTV, and East India head for Australasian Channel [V], Shreya Sen-Handley is the author of two books with HarperCollins, the recently published short story collection Strange, and the award-winning Memoirs of My Body, published in 2017. A librettist for the Welsh National Opera, the first South Asian woman to have written an international opera according to the international press, their multicultural opera Migrations will go on tour in the UK in 2021. Shreya is also a columnist for the international media, writing for the National Geographic, CNN, The HinduTimes of IndiaThe Guardian, and more, a creative writing teacher for British universities and other institutions, and an illustrator for Hachette, HarperCollins, Welsh National Opera, Arts Council England, and Nottingham UNESCO City of Literature. Her short stories have been published, broadcast, and shortlisted for prizes in Britain, India and Australia. This year she wrote her first ever poems, which went on to be published and broadcast in Britain and India, as well as spearheading a British national campaign against hate crimes. She is currently working on a new Welsh National Opera production Creating Change in which she combines poetry and illustration, and writing her third book for HarperCollins, the travelogue The Accidental Tourist, alongside her monthly column for top Asian newspapers The Asian Age and Deccan Chronicle.”

Please click on image to read an excerpt from ‘Strange’, HarperCollins, 2019.

Top Notts Magazine Covers Our Opera

“She’s had two books published by HarperCollins, written for international media and was even the regional head of a television channel at the age of 25. It’s fair to say that there are achievers in this world, and then there’s Shreya Sen-Handley. And if that impressive CV wasn’t enough, she’s now become the first Indian and South Asian woman to write a Western, international opera, called Migrations. We catch up with the multi-talented writer to find out more…” (please click on pic to read more)

Best Independent British Bookstore interviews me as part of their British author series, premiere on 29th September

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The Best Independent British Bookstore of 2018 (and regional winner before and after), Five Leaves Bookshop, interviewed me this week as part of a new online series on British authors. It was a wonderful half-hour chatting and laughing with the amazing Pippa Hennessy who plays a pivotal role for literature in the region, spearheading the campaign that brought Nottingham its UNESCO City of Literature status. In the course of the interview, I was asked to read from my HarperCollins collection of modern tales of the unexpected, ‘Strange’, and judging by the broad smile on Pippa’s face, it went down well. Please do watch the interview when it premieres on September 29th, and all the other fabulous interviews that are already out. Here, in the meantime, is a picture of us with Henry Normal, the BAFTA winning creator of popular British sitcoms like ‘The Royle Family’ and ‘Alan Partridge’, Oscar-nominated film ‘Philomena’ starring Judi Dench, and more, on a panel discussing writing. Henry Normal is another of the authors interviewed in the Five Leaves series. Please click on the pic to know more. 

My ‘spooky’ column for Indian newspapers in June

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it is a haunted world we live in right now. Our deserted public spaces are peopled by wraiths, not just of those who have tragically died in the pandemic, but all of us who have retreated from the world, living a shadow of the lives we once did.

The homes of those who live alone or in unhappy domestic situations are echoing wells of loneliness, and maybe even fear. Even in happy homes, the ghosts of extended family and visiting friends can still be seen flitting around corners.

In their passing on from our lives, though not from this world, they have taken on an otherworldly sheen. Our home in Sherwood forest, where the past incessantly rubs shoulders with the present, is now infested with them.

At least, that was the (im)possibility we were forced to consider when, as the summer progressed and lockdown laid root, our nights suddenly filled with voices…

(Please click on pic for rest of story)